Using sed to format a phone number

Formatting an unformated “phone” number using sed.

There may be a different and easier way to do this, but the main thing to learn here is the ^, $, and [[:digit:]] options.

^ refers to the first part of a line
& which is our searched for pattern
$ refers to an end part of the line
[[:digit:]] searches for, you guessed it. Digits!

The following command reads the incoming 10 digit number form echo and does the following.

the ^ tells it that the pattern needs to match at the beginning of the line
[[:digit:]] repeated tells it to search for three consecutive digits
(&) tells it to put brackets around the & which is our searched for pattern in the first part.
We then pipe that to another sed command which
searches for 4 consecutive digits
the $ tells it that it needs to be at the end of the line.

echo "1234567890" | sed -e 's/^[[:digit:]][[:digit:]][[:digit:]]/(&) /g' | sed -e 's/[[:digit:]][[:digit:]][[:digit:]][[:digit:]]$/-&/g'

Resulting output is

(123) 456-7890

The following link was helpful while searching what the ^ and $ options do.

https://www.computerhope.com/unix/used.htm

Linux Screen – Create, Connect, Disconnect, Terminate Sessions

Screen is a handy tool that can help you run scripts on servers remotely without having to worry about the session getting terminated. It seems to operate kinda like a virtual console.

Create Screen Session

Create a new session with a specified name

screen -S SessionName

Example output below. Create session named testsession and print screen sessions.

[bob@localhost imapsync]$ screen -S testsession
[bob@localhost imapsync]$ screen -ls
There are screens on:
3313.testsession (Attached)
1 Sockets in /var/run/screen/S-bob.
[bob@localhost imapsync]$

Disconnect from Screen Session

You can disconnect from a screen session by hitting ctrl + a and then ctrl +d

“ctrl + a” then “ctrl + d”

List Screen Sessions

You can list the screen sessions with

screen -ls

Example

[bob@localhost imapsync]$ screen -ls
There are screens on:
3212.testsession (Detached)
2556.xap (Detached)

2 Sockets in /var/run/screen/S-bob.
[bob@localhost imapsync]$

Connect to screen Session

You can reconnect to a screen session with

screen -r testsession 

Terminate Screen Session

To terminate a screen session, connect to that session and then on a clear line hit ctrl + d

Same way as if you were closing a remote ssh connection.

Bash Loop Examples

For i in 1-100 do

Basically count to 100 and perform an operation each time i increases.

for ((i=1; i<=100;i++))
do 
  echo $i
done

for loop 1 liner

for ((i=1; i<=100;i++)) do echo $i ; done

While true (Execute forever)

Handy if you just want a script to run and repeat the same thing over and over again. Doesn't stop till you kill it.

while true
do
  echo "Repeat till infinity"
  sleep 1
done

While command is true

The following will execute the loop as long as the command in the () returns true. Once it returns false, it'll stop the loop

while (fping incredigeek.com | grep alive); 
do
  echo alive
  sleep 1
done

Bash array example

#!/bin/bash
array=(one two three)
echo "Printing first object in array."  #Replace 0 with the place number of the array item
echo ${array[0]}

echo ""

echo "Whole array"
echo ${array[*]} 

echo "" 

echo "Array indexes" 
echo ${!array[*]}

Output

Printing first object in array. 
one

Whole array
one two three

Array indexes
0 1 2

https://www.linuxjournal.com/content/bash-arrays

Delete files older than x days – Linux


You can use find command to find and delete files older than the specified days. In this case 30.

find /backup/* -mtime +30 -exec rm {} \;

Non recursive example. The -prune option should limit find to only look for files in the /backup directory. So it won’t check any subdirectories.

find /backup/* -prune -mtime +30 -exec rm {} \; 

Setting up Proxy over SSH on Linux

Initiate a ssh connection to the server or device you want to use as a proxy. You can change the port to something else if so desired.

ssh username@ipaddress -D 1880

Log in and leave the session running

You can now setup your computer or browser to use the Proxy.
Specify SOCKS Host, hostname is either localhost or 127.0.0.1, the port is 1880.

Firefox example below.

Secure Erase Hard Drive using DD

The following commands are dangerous! Proceed with caution!

Change /dev/sdX to your drive. Make sure you get the correct drive, or you could wipe you main system.

dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdX bs=1M status=progress

The status=progress part shows how much dd has writen. Helpful to gauge how far along it is.

If you want a more secure way to erase the drive, change zero to random. Makes it slower, but should be more secure.

dd if=/dev/random of=/dev/sdX bs=1M status=progres

Side note, these commands should work in macOS, but you may need to drop the status=progress option.

Install dig on Ubuntu, Debian or Kali Linux

install dig
Help options for dig


Dig is a DNS lookup utility.  It is included in most Linux distributions by default, but if it isn’t you can easily install dig with the following command.

The dig utility is apart of the dnsutils package

sudo apt-get install dnsutils -y

After it is installed, we can verify that it is working with

dig -v

For more information on how to use dig, refer to the following link.

https://www.howtogeek.com/663056/how-to-use-the-dig-command-on-linux/

The following is copied and pasted from the dig man page.

NAME
       dig - DNS lookup utility

SYNOPSIS
       dig [@server] [-b address] [-c class] [-f filename] [-k filename] [-m] [-p port#] [-q name]
           [-t type] [-v] [-x addr] [-y [hmac:]name:key] [[-4] | [-6]] [name] [type] [class]
           [queryopt...]

       dig [-h]

       dig [global-queryopt...] [query...]

DESCRIPTION
       dig is a flexible tool for interrogating DNS name servers. It performs DNS lookups and
       displays the answers that are returned from the name server(s) that were queried. Most DNS
       administrators use dig to troubleshoot DNS problems because of its flexibility, ease of use
       and clarity of output. Other lookup tools tend to have less functionality than dig.

       Although dig is normally used with command-line arguments, it also has a batch mode of
       operation for reading lookup requests from a file. A brief summary of its command-line
       arguments and options is printed when the -h option is given. Unlike earlier versions, the
       BIND 9 implementation of dig allows multiple lookups to be issued from the command line.

       Unless it is told to query a specific name server, dig will try each of the servers listed
       in /etc/resolv.conf. If no usable server addresses are found, dig will send the query to the
       local host.

       When no command line arguments or options are given, dig will perform an NS query for "."
       (the root).

       It is possible to set per-user defaults for dig via ${HOME}/.digrc. This file is read and
       any options in it are applied before the command line arguments. The -r option disables this
       feature, for scripts that need predictable behaviour.

       The IN and CH class names overlap with the IN and CH top level domain names. Either use the
       -t and -c options to specify the type and class, use the -q the specify the domain name, or
       use "IN." and "CH." when looking up these top level domains.

SIMPLE USAGE
       A typical invocation of dig looks like:

            dig @server name type

       where:

       server
           is the name or IP address of the name server to query. This can be an IPv4 address in
           dotted-decimal notation or an IPv6 address in colon-delimited notation. When the
           supplied server argument is a hostname, dig resolves that name before querying that name
           server.

           If no server argument is provided, dig consults /etc/resolv.conf; if an address is found
           there, it queries the name server at that address. If either of the -4 or -6 options are
           in use, then only addresses for the corresponding transport will be tried. If no usable
           addresses are found, dig will send the query to the local host. The reply from the name
           server that responds is displayed.

       name
           is the name of the resource record that is to be looked up.

       type
           indicates what type of query is required — ANY, A, MX, SIG, etc.  type can be any valid
           query type. If no type argument is supplied, dig will perform a lookup for an A record.