Windows 10 – Super slow copy speeds

It looks like the Windows Defender Real-time protection can cause issues when trying to copy files on a local drive even if the drive is an SSD.  Typically a copy seems to start out great, but then slows down to a crawl less then 1MB/s copy rate.  Probably has to do with Defender having to scan every file as it is copied.

To fix/increase the copy speeds you can turn off Real-time protection.

To turn off Windows Defender Real-time protection, open up Settings > Update and Security > Windows Security > Virus & threat protection “That should open up the Windows Defender Security Center” > Virus & threat protection settings

Now Turn Real-time protection off.

 

Add a SSL Certificate to Ubiquiti UniFi-Video server using Lets Encrypt

Install certbot

sudo apt-get install python-certbot

Generate certificate.  Change unifi.yourdomain.com to the domain name you have pointing to your UniFi-Video controller.

sudo certbot certonly -d unifi.yourdomain.com

Certbot will create the files in “/etc/letsencrypt/live/unifi.yourdomain.com/”

Now you should stop the unifi service.

systemctl stop unifi

The following two commands create and install the keystore for the UniFi-Video application.  These commands were copied from here.  Thanks scobber!

echo ubiquiti | openssl pkcs12 -export -inkey /etc/letsencrypt/live/unifi.yourdomain.com/privkey.pem -in /etc/letsencrypt/live/unifi.yourdomain.com/cert.pem -name airvision -out /usr/lib/unifi-video/data/keys.p12 -password stdin
echo y | keytool -importkeystore -srckeystore /etc/letsencrypt/live/unifi.yourdomain.com/keys.p12 -srcstoretype pkcs12 -destkeystore /usr/lib/unifi-video/data/keystore -storepass ubiquiti -srcstorepass ubiquiti

Remove or rename the Trusted Store.  If you don’t, the cameras will connect, but will not record.  The controller will rebuild the ufv-truststore when it starts up and the cameras will be able to record.

mv /usr/lib/unifi-video/data/ufv-truststore{,.old}

Start the UniFi-Video service

systemctl start unifi-video

Now you can check it by going to https://unifi.yourdomain.com:8443

Install VMware tools on Ubuntu VM

In Ubuntu the simplest way to install the VMware tools is through apt.

sudo apt-get install open-vmware-tools

Shouldn’t have to do anything else.

You can also install the tools by hitting Install VMware tools from either the web UI, or vShpere.  This will mount a virtual CD on the OS, you can then copy the contents to a local directory in the vm.  You can then proceed to install them by extracting the tar file with

tar -xzf VMware*

cd into the new directory

cd vmware*

and run

sudo ./vmware-install.pl

Ubuntu UniFi server running out of space on /run

Had an issue that /run was randomly running out of space which in turn would interfere with the unifi-video service causing it to run, but not record.

/run looks like a tmpfs or ramdisk that Ubuntu sets up.  So you can do a “temporary” fix by remounting the tmpfs with a larger size.  Example below.  If /run is a 2GB directory, you can remount changing the size from 2GB to 2.5GB.

sudo mount -t tmpsfs tmpfs /run -o remount,size=2500M

Note that it is a temporary fix and goes away after a reboot.

The issue ended up being that the WiFi UniFi controller was setup to auto backup everything once a week.  So as it was backing stuff up, it would eat up the available space in the tmpfs, think there may be an issue with the size of the UniFi data and maybe not being able to fit it all in RAM?

Running the following command

df -h --max=1 /var | sort

shows the following

1.1M /run/udev
2.5G /run/
2.5G /run/unifi   <-- UniFi controller
4.0K /run/initramfs
8.0K /run/network
12K /run/user
288K /run/samba
404K /run/systemd

Looking inside the unifi directory shows the following folders.  Looks like the they are temp files.

200M /run/unifi/ExpTmp351719567129045774
696M /run/unifi/ExpTmp3406220793759111216
1.6G /run/unifi/ExpTmp3368400690321364109
0 /run/unifi/work
2.5G /run/unifi

Running an ls inside the folder shows

-rw-r----- 1 unifi unifi 13971807 Jul 2 02:30 db.gz
-rw-r----- 1 unifi unifi 1665223462 Jul 2 02:56 db_stat.gz

Looking inside the UniFi controller it is set to auto backup on Monday at 2:30AM

Looks like “/run/unifi” is used as a temporary folder to create the backups and when it is completed converts it to a .unf file and moves it to “/usr/lib/unifi/data/backup/autobackup/”  So the left over temp files were never completed or something caused them to stop working.  Maybe the backup was big enough to take up all the tmpfs space and cause the backup to fail.

Resolution.  To fix the problem I turned the data retention down to a week and deleted the temp files in /var/unifi.  Had to sudo su to root.  sudo wasn’t cutting it for some reason.

sudo su
rm -rf /var/unifi/Exp*
exit

Should be all good now.

Repairing Fedora grub from chroot

Notes from repairing a Fedora drive.

Mount system in chroot.

If the system is a raid drive and your not able to access it refer to this post.  May just need to install the raid utilities.

For mounting the chroot environment refer to this post

Repairing grub

yum install grub2-efi-*

Install grub.  Change /sda to your drive, may need to specify the efi partition.

grub2-install /dev/sda

If your boot and efi partitions are mounted.

grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/efi/EFI/fedora/grub.cfg

Reboot.