Setup SNMPv3 on ESXI VMware server

SSH into the VMware server

ssh root@vmwareserver

Set the auth and priv types

esxcli system snmp set -a MD5 -x AES128

Generate hashes

The hashes are needed to create the user.  Replace authpass and privhash to the password you want.

esxcli system snmp hash --auth-hash authpass --priv-hash privhash --raw-secret

Create user 

Replace authhash and privhash with the auth and priv hashes returned from the above command.

esxcli system snmp set -e yes -C contact@incredigeek.com -u snmpuser/authhash/privhash/priv

 

Single line Command

Change authpassword and privpassword to your authentication and private passwords.

authpass="authpassword" && privpass="privpassword" && esxcli system snmp set -a MD5 -x AES128 && esxcli system snmp hash --auth-hash ${authpass} --priv-hash ${privpass} --raw-secret && esxcli system snmp set -e yes -C ${contact} -u snmpuser/${authhash}/${privhash}/priv

 

View SNMP Configuration

esxcli system snmp get

Basic MongoDB commands

Connect to Mongo database

mongo

Connect to Mongo on a different port (May be needed.  Port is for UniFi server)

mongo -port 27117

Show Databases

show dbs

Use database

use dbname

Show tables/collections

show collections

or

show tables

List users

show users

Authenticate

db.auth("username","password")

Insert into table

d = {"data":"data"}
db.collection.insert(d)

Example

d = {"name":"admin","lang":"en_US","x_password":"password","time_created":"","last_site_name":"default"}
db.admin.insert(d)

Add extra drive to UniFi Video Controller

Find your disk drive using fdisk or some other utility.  More info here.

fdisk -l

Example:

steve@ubuntu:~$ sudo fdisk -l
Disk /dev/sda: 32 GiB, 34359738368 bytes, 67108864 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xe96d30af

Device     Boot    Start      End  Sectors Size Id Type
/dev/sda1  *        2048 58720255 58718208  28G 83 Linux
/dev/sda2       58722302 67106815  8384514   4G  5 Extended
/dev/sda5       58722304 67106815  8384512   4G 82 Linux swap / Solaris


Disk /dev/sdb: 557 GiB, 598074195968 bytes, 1168113664 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
steve@ubuntu:~$

The drive is the 500GiB drive /dev/sdb

Create a partition on the drive.  Warning!  Be careful when formatting drives and make sure you don’t format the wrong one!

echo ';' | sfdisk /dev/sdb

You should now see the partition when you run fdisk -l again.  If you run into issues mounting the drive, try formating the drive with a different utility i.e.(fdisk, cfdisk, gparted etc.)

steve@ubuntu:~$ sudo fdisk -l
Disk /dev/sdb: 557 GiB, 598074195968 bytes, 1168113664 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x717f99ba

Device     Boot Start        End    Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sdb1        2048 1168113663 1168111616  557G 83 Linux   <--New Partition
steve@ubuntu:~$

Create mount point

mkdir -p /video/mount/point

Now mount the partition

mount /dev/sdb1 /video/mount/point

Allow unifi-video user to own the mount point

chown -R video/mount/point

Add the drive to /etc/fstab to auto mount on system bootup.  More info here.

Change /dev/sdXx to your drive and /MOUNTLOCATION to your mount location.

sudo echo "/dev/sdXx /MOUNTLOCATION ext4 rw,defaults 0 0 " >> /etc/fstab

Example:

sudo echo "/dev/sdb1 /video/mount/point ext4 rw,defaults 0 0 " >> /etc/fstab

If you have issues running the above command, you can manually add it to the file with

sudo vi /etc/fstab

add the following line to the bottom of the file.  Change sdXx to your drive and /MOUNTLOCATION to the mount location of the drive.

/dev/sdXx /MOUNTLOCATION ext4 rw,defaults 0 0

You can reboot the system to make sure that the drive mounts properly.

Now you can log into the UniFi Video controller and set the Recording Path by going to Settings>SYSTEM CONFIGURATION>CONFIGURE and set the Recording Path to /video/mount/point

Tip. In the SYSTEM CONFIGURATION menu you can hover over the Disk and it’ll show you your total amount of recording space.

Install UniFi Video 3.8.5 on Ubuntu or Debian

You can run all the commands from the terminal, or ssh into the server

See here if you need to setup SSH on the server.

Install prerequisites

sudo apt-get install mongodb mongodb-server openjdk-8-jre-headless jsvc

Download UniFi Video installer

Note the Debian package works on Ubuntu, and has been tested on the latest Ubuntu

wget https://dl.ubnt.com/firmwares/ufv/v3.8.5/unifi-video.Debian7_amd64.v3.8.5.deb

Install package

sudo dpkg -i unifi-video.Debian7_amd64.v3.8.5.deb

Login to the UniFi Video controller using your web browser and going to the following address to finish configuring the NVR.

https://your-server-address:7443

Install SSH Server on Linux (Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, CentOS, RedHat)

Debian / Ubuntu

sudo apt-get install -y openssh-server

RPM based Distros, Fedora / CentOS / RedHat

sudo dnf install -y openssh-server

or use yum

sudo yum install -y openssh-server

Start ssh service

sudo systemctl start sshd

By default the SSH service should start when the system starts, but if not try the following command to enable the service on boot up.

Debian / Ubuntu

systemctl enable ssh

Fedora, CentOS, RedHat

systemctl enable ssh

Change SSH port

Not necessary, but it is a good idea to change the default ssh port.  To change the port edit the sshd file.

vi /etc/ssh/sshd_config

Linux add mount point to fstab

You can use the Linux /etc/fstab to automatically mount hard drives on system boot up.  In the file you should see all your default system mount points, to add another hard drive or mount point, just create a new line at the bottom of the file and put in the following info

/dev/drive          /mount/point    filesystem   options    0      0

Example:

/dev/sdb1           /mnt/    ext4       rw,defaults         0      0

You can also use the UUID of the drive. You can find the UUID by running the following command

sudo blkid

In the fstab file just replace the /dev/drivename with the UUID

UUID=ba84c923-4413-090a-441d-6e12f32991b3         /mnt    ext4  rw   0      0

Upgrade Firmware on Ubiquiti Airmax Equipment from the Command Line/SSH

Upgrading the firmware via the command line is super easy.  Basic steps are

  1. Upload firmware file to radio using ftp, scp, or download directly to radio using wget
  2. Move the firmware the /tmp and rename to fwupdate.bin
  3. Upgrade the firmware by running
ubntbox fwupdate.real -m fwupdate.bin

More Detail explanation

Downloading Firmware to Radio

There are a couple of ways to get the firmware uploaded to the radio

  1. Download from Ubiquiti’s website and upload via ftp, scp, filezilla or like
  2. Download directly to the radio using wget

Using wget

ssh into the radio.  Change username and ip address as needed.

ssh ubnt@192.168.1.20

cd to the /tmp directory

cd /tmp

Find the firmware file on Ubiquiti’s website, accept the terms, copy the link and paste the link in the terminal after wget.  Replace the below link with the appropriate firmware link.

wget https://dl.ubnt.com/firmwares/XC-fw/v8.4.2/WA.v8.4.2.35930.171017.1722.bin

Installing Firmware

Rename firmware

mv *.bin fwupdate.bin

Start the upgrade

ubntbox fwupdate.real -m fwupdate.bin

The radio will now upgrade and reboot

Another Method.  Using the ubntmod.sh script

Another way to upgrade a radios firmware from the command line is to use the UBNTMOD tool.  More info on the UBNTMOD script is available here.

Make sure you have the firmware downloaded to your computer and run ubntmod.sh with the “-U” upgrade option.

Example,

bob@localhost:~$ ./ubntmod.sh -i 192.168.1.20 -U WA.v8.4.2.35930.171017.1722.bin

Setup SNMP v3 on Debian or Ubuntu

All the following commands should work on Ubuntu, or just about any other Debian based Linux distro.  If you have a firewall on the server, you’ll need to allow UDP on port 161.

Install SNMP

Install snmp, snmpd, and libsnmp.

sudo apt-get -y install snmp snmpd libsnmp-dev

Stop the snmpd service so we can add a user

sudo service snmpd stop

Add SNMP v3 user

  • Change AuthPassword to your Authentication password
  • Change CryptoPassword to your Crypto Password
  • Change privUser to your private users username
sudo net-snmp-config --create-snmpv3-user -ro -A AuthPassword -X CryptoPassword -a MD5 -x AES privUser

Change System Location, System Contact, and allow SNMP on all interfaces

Open up the SNMP config file usually in /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf

vi /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf

Search for “sysLocation”  and change to whatever your system location is.

Search for “sysContact” and change it.  It should be right underneath sysLocation.

Now allow SNMP on all interfaces.  Find the following line and comment it out.

agentAddress udp:127.0.0.1:161

Add a # to the beginning.

#agentAddress udp:127.0.0.1:161

Now find this line (should be a couple lines down from the line you just commented out)

#agentAddress udp:161,udp6:[::1]:161

and uncomment it

agentAddress udp:161,udp6:[::1]:161

That will enable it so you can read the SNMP info using the servers IP address, as opposed to being limited to localhost.

Start the SNMP service and Test

Start the SNMP service

service snmpd start

Test with

snmpwalk -v3 -a MD5 -A AuthPassword -X CryptoPassword -l authNoPriv -u privUser localhost