Named Debugging Levels

In the following command, x should be the debug level number

named -g -d x

Example,

named -g -d 3

Following info taken from here.
https://docstore.mik.ua/orelly/networking/dnsbind/ch12_01.htm

12.1.1 What Information Is at Each Level?

Here is a list of the information that each debugging level will give. The debugging information is cumulative; for example, level 2 includes all level 1’s debugging information. The data are divided into the following basic areas: starting up, updating the database, processing queries, and maintaining zones. We won’t cover updating the name server’s internal database – problems always occur elsewhere. However, what the name server adds or deletes from its internal database can be a problem, as you’ll see in Chapter 13, Troubleshooting DNS and BIND .

Level 1

The information at this level is necessarily brief. Name servers can process lots of queries, which can create lots of debugging output. Since the output is condensed, you can collect data over long periods. Use this debugging level for basic startup information and for watching query transactions. You’ll see some errors logged at this level, including syntax errors and DNS packet formatting errors. This level will also show referrals.

Level 2

Level 2 provides lots of useful stuff: it lists the IP addresses of remote name servers that are used during a lookup, along with their round trip time values; it calls out bad responses; and it tags a response as to which type of query it is answering, a SYSTEM (sysquery) or a USER query. When you are tracking down a problem with a secondary server loading a zone, this level shows you the zone values – serial number, refresh time, retry time, expire time, and time left – as the secondary checks if it is up-to-date with its master.

Level 3

Level 3 debugging becomes much more verbose because it generates lots of messages about updating the name server database. Make sure you have enough disk space if you are going to collect debugging output at level 3 or above. At level 3, you’ll also see: duplicate queries called out, system queries generated (sysquery), the names of the remote name servers used during a lookup, and the number of addresses found for each server.

Level 4

Use level 4 debugging when you want to see the query and response packets received by the name server. This level also shows the credibility level for cached data.

Level 5

There are a variety of messages at level 5, but none of them are particularly useful for general debugging. This level includes some error messages, for example, when a malloc() fails, and a message when the name server gives up on a query.

Level 6

Level 6 shows you the response sent to the original query.

Level 7

Level 7 shows you a few configuration and parsing messages.

Level 8

There is no significant debugging information at this level.

Level 9

There is no significant debugging information at this level.

Level 10

Use level 10 debugging when you want to see the query and response packets sent by the name server. The format of these packets is the same format used in level 4. You wouldn’t use this level very often, since you can see the name server response packet with nslookup .

Level 11

There are only a couple of debugging messages at this level, and they are in seldom-traversed code.

How To Increase Session Timeout for SSH

From the server side, edit the /etc/ssh/sshd_config

Change, uncomment, or add

ClientAliveInterval 120
ClientAliveCountMax 15

Change the AliveInterval and CountMax as desired.

More info on the AliveIntercal and CountMax.

ClientAliveCountMax Sets the number of client alive messages which may be sent without sshd(8) receiving any messages back from the client. If this threshold is reached while client alive messages are being sent, sshd will disconnect the client, terminating the session. It is important to note that the use of client alive messages is very different from TCPKeepAlive. The client alive messages are sent through the encrypted channel and therefore will not be spoofable. The TCP keepalive option enabled by TCPKeepAlive is spoofable. The client alive mechanism is valuable when the client or server depend on knowing when a connection has become unresponsive.

The default value is 3. If ClientAliveInterval is set to 15, and ClientAliveCountMax is left at the default, unresponsive SSH clients will be disconnected after approximately 45 seconds. Setting a zero

ClientAliveCountMax disables connection termination.ClientAliveInterval Sets a timeout interval in seconds after which if no data has been received from the client, sshd(8) will send a message through the encrypted channel to request a response from the client. The default is 0, indicating that these messages will not be sent to the client.

More information
https://man.openbsd.org/sshd_config

Turn 3.5mm Jack on Raspberry Pi Running LineageOS 16

You will need an Android Terminal. You can turn on the default one in the developer settings. Need to turn on developer mode?

You will also need to enable root which can also be done in the Developer settings

Open up the terminal app and run

su
rpi3-audio-jack.sh

More info here

https://konstakang.com/devices/rpi3/LineageOS16.0/

LibreNMS update to Python 3

You may get the following alert in LibreNMS. Basically you need to install python 3 to keep things up to date.

Python 3 is required to run LibreNMS as of May, 2020. You need to install Python 3 to continue to receive updates. If you do not install Python 3 and required packages, LibreNMS will continue to function but stop receiving bug fixes and updates.

Install Python 3

Install Python 3 with yum, or apt if you are on a Debian based distro.

sudo yum install python3
sudo pip3 install -r /opt/librenms/requirements.txt

Verify LibreNMS is updated and working

Run the following commands to make sure that LibreNMS is working correctly and is up to date.

cd /opt/librenms
sudo ./validate.php
sudo ./daily.sh

Upgrade AirFiber 11 to 4.1 from SSH

https://help.ui.com/hc/en-us/articles/204977444-airFiber-Updating-the-Firmware

Quick list of commands

ssh ubnt@192.168.1.20  <- Replace with username and IP address
cd /tmp
wget http://dl.ui.com/firmwares/airfiber11X/v4.1.0/AF11.v4.1.0.bin
mv AF11.v4.1.0.bin fwupdate.bin
/sbin/fwupdate -m
  1. Upload the firmware using FTP or SCP to the /tmp directory
  2. Rename the file from AF11…bin to fwupdate.bin
  3. Start the upgrade with
/sbin/fwupdate -m

Wait for it to finish upgrading

Linux Screen – Create, Connect, Disconnect, Terminate Sessions

Screen is a handy tool that can help you run scripts on servers remotely without having to worry about the session getting terminated. It seems to operate kinda like a virtual console.

Create Screen Session

Create a new session with a specified name

screen -S SessionName

Example output below. Create session named testsession and print screen sessions.

[bob@localhost imapsync]$ screen -S testsession
[bob@localhost imapsync]$ screen -ls
There are screens on:
3313.testsession (Attached)
1 Sockets in /var/run/screen/S-bob.
[bob@localhost imapsync]$

Disconnect from Screen Session

You can disconnect from a screen session by hitting ctrl + a and then ctrl +d

“ctrl + a” then “ctrl + d”

List Screen Sessions

You can list the screen sessions with

screen -ls

Example

[bob@localhost imapsync]$ screen -ls
There are screens on:
3212.testsession (Detached)
2556.xap (Detached)

2 Sockets in /var/run/screen/S-bob.
[bob@localhost imapsync]$

Connect to screen Session

You can reconnect to a screen session with

screen -r testsession 

Terminate Screen Session

To terminate a screen session, connect to that session and then on a clear line hit ctrl + d

Same way as if you were closing a remote ssh connection.

VIM delete all lines not matching pattern

In Vi you can use the following command to search for a pattern and delete all those lines

:%g/pattern-to-search-for/d

To inverse the operation and delete all lines not matching the pattern, change g to v

:%v/pattern-to-search-for/d