apt install python-pip, Unable to locate package – Ubuntu

When trying to install pip on Ubuntu with

sudo apt install python-pip

get the following error

Unable to locate package python-pip

Does the same thing for other basic packages. One of which was nasm “Dependency for Chipsec”

Issue ended up being that the Community-maintaned source was not enabled. Enabled via the Software & Updates. Should be able to search for it and it should come up.

Ubuntu apt-get install, error with org.freedesktop.systemd1.service

Had an issue trying to recover from a failed upgrade.  Apt would complain about dependencies, suggested running apt-get install -f.

Running apt-get install -f would still fail.  It showed a conflict with the systemd1.service, ended up renaming the file with the following command

sudo mv /usr/share/dbus-1/system-service/org.freedesktop.systemd1.service{,bak}

and reran

sudo apt-get install -f

after that I was able to rerun the upgrade and finish

sudo apt-get upgrade

Connect to WiFi network via command line

Easiest way is to use the Network Manager nmtui tool

nmtui

It gives you a “command line GUI” to search and select your preferred WiFi network.

Alternate way is to use the iw tools.

Scan for available WiFi networks

iwlist scan

Connect with iwconfig, replace WiFiName with your WiFi name.  Note this only works with open networks.

iwconfig wlan0 essid WiFiName

You’ll need to get an address now, so run

dhclient

Check if your DNS is working.  If not, as a “hack” manually add it to /etc/resolv.conf and restart the networking service.

sudo echo "nameserver 8.8.8.8" >> /etc/resolv.conf
sudo service networking restart

Your not supposed to manually put the nameservers in resolv.conf.  But it works in a pinch.

Install VMware tools on Ubuntu VM

In Ubuntu the simplest way to install the VMware tools is through apt.

sudo apt-get install open-vmware-tools

Shouldn’t have to do anything else.

You can also install the tools by hitting Install VMware tools from either the web UI, or vShpere.  This will mount a virtual CD on the OS, you can then copy the contents to a local directory in the vm.  You can then proceed to install them by extracting the tar file with

tar -xzf VMware*

cd into the new directory

cd vmware*

and run

sudo ./vmware-install.pl

Ubuntu UniFi server running out of space on /run

Had an issue that /run was randomly running out of space which in turn would interfere with the unifi-video service causing it to run, but not record.

/run looks like a tmpfs or ramdisk that Ubuntu sets up.  So you can do a “temporary” fix by remounting the tmpfs with a larger size.  Example below.  If /run is a 2GB directory, you can remount changing the size from 2GB to 2.5GB.

sudo mount -t tmpsfs tmpfs /run -o remount,size=2500M

Note that it is a temporary fix and goes away after a reboot.

The issue ended up being that the WiFi UniFi controller was setup to auto backup everything once a week.  So as it was backing stuff up, it would eat up the available space in the tmpfs, think there may be an issue with the size of the UniFi data and maybe not being able to fit it all in RAM?

Running the following command

df -h --max=1 /var | sort

shows the following

1.1M /run/udev
2.5G /run/
2.5G /run/unifi   <-- UniFi controller
4.0K /run/initramfs
8.0K /run/network
12K /run/user
288K /run/samba
404K /run/systemd

Looking inside the unifi directory shows the following folders.  Looks like the they are temp files.

200M /run/unifi/ExpTmp351719567129045774
696M /run/unifi/ExpTmp3406220793759111216
1.6G /run/unifi/ExpTmp3368400690321364109
0 /run/unifi/work
2.5G /run/unifi

Running an ls inside the folder shows

-rw-r----- 1 unifi unifi 13971807 Jul 2 02:30 db.gz
-rw-r----- 1 unifi unifi 1665223462 Jul 2 02:56 db_stat.gz

Looking inside the UniFi controller it is set to auto backup on Monday at 2:30AM

Looks like “/run/unifi” is used as a temporary folder to create the backups and when it is completed converts it to a .unf file and moves it to “/usr/lib/unifi/data/backup/autobackup/”  So the left over temp files were never completed or something caused them to stop working.  Maybe the backup was big enough to take up all the tmpfs space and cause the backup to fail.

Resolution.  To fix the problem I turned the data retention down to a week and deleted the temp files in /var/unifi.  Had to sudo su to root.  sudo wasn’t cutting it for some reason.

sudo su
rm -rf /var/unifi/Exp*
exit

Should be all good now.

Delete SNMPv3 User on Linux

Don’t know if this is the recommended way to delete a user, but it seems to work.

sudo service snmpd stop

Open up the snmpd.conf file in /var/lib and find the line with the SNMP user and delete the line

sudo vi /var/lib/snmp/snmpd.conf

The above file may be in the following location on RPM based systems.

sudo vi /var/lib/net-snmp/snmpd.conf

Save, exit, and start snmpd

sudo service snmpd start

These steps work for Ubuntu, but should work for any Debain based distro as well as CentOS, Fedora, RedHat etc.