Recovery, Your PC/Device needs to be repaired

File: \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\BCD
Error code: 0x000000f 
The Boot Configuration data for your PC is missing or contains errors.

The following notes may be of some help when trying to resolve the above error. Think the primary issue had to do with cloning a GPT drive to a RAID array that was using MBR. So think everything worked after converting it to GPT

All the commands are/were run from a recovery Command Prompt

Convert MBR disk to GPT

After running the following command the EFI directory was automatically created.
The command is supposed to be non destructive. Change the disk to whichever disk your trying to change to gpt.

gpt2efi /validate /disk:0

Other commands

If running the above command did not work then you may give the following command a try. Change the drive names where appropriate.

bcdboot c:\windows /s s: /f UEFI /v

You may be able to get away with just using

cdboot c:\windows

You can check if the above worked by seeing if it created any files in the directory, if new efi partition is S:, then from a command prompt run

S:
dir

Commands for recreating the EFI partition (WARNING! MAY DESTROY DATA!)

diskpart
list disk
select disk # Note: Select the disk where you deleted the EFI System partition.
list partition
create partition efi
format quick fs=fat32
list partition
list volume


BitLocker – Command Prompt Commands

You’ll need administrator privileges to use these command. You can also run them from a command prompt in recovery

Check Status

manage-bde -status

Turn off Encryption

manage-bde -off C:

Change C: to the drive that has BitLocker on it. Check with the status command. May not be C if your in recovery.
Also note that after the encryption is turned off it takes awhile to decrypt. Check with status command

Unlock BitLocker Encrypted Drive

manage-bde -unlock C: -recoverypassword 11111-...-99999

Replace C: with actual drive

Replace the numbers at the end to your actual recovery key.

How to Find System Uptime in Windows

There are a few different ways to view the system uptime.   either the Task Manager or the Command Prompt.

Task Manager

Launch the Task manager by using the Ctrl+Shift+ESC Shortcut keys, Right clicking on the Task Bar, or by searching and launching from the start menu.

Go to the Performance tab, view Up time at the bottom (On Windows 10 you may need to hit More “details first”

 

Command Prompt

Launch the Command Prompt.  Can do this by clicking start and searching for cmd.

Then run

 systeminfo | find "System Boot Time"

It’ll show you when the system last started up.

Example:

C:\Users\Owner>systeminfo | find "System Boot Time"
System Boot Time: 6/21/2018, 3:45:12 AM

C:\Users\Owner>