Ubuntu apt-get install, error with org.freedesktop.systemd1.service

Had an issue trying to recover from a failed upgrade.  Apt would complain about dependencies, suggested running apt-get install -f.

Running apt-get install -f would still fail.  It showed a conflict with the systemd1.service, ended up renaming the file with the following command

sudo mv /usr/share/dbus-1/system-service/org.freedesktop.systemd1.service{,bak}

and reran

sudo apt-get install -f

after that I was able to rerun the upgrade and finish

sudo apt-get upgrade

Connect to WiFi network via command line

Easiest way is to use the Network Manager nmtui tool

nmtui

It gives you a “command line GUI” to search and select your preferred WiFi network.

Alternate way is to use the iw tools.

Scan for available WiFi networks

iwlist scan

Connect with iwconfig, replace WiFiName with your WiFi name.  Note this only works with open networks.

iwconfig wlan0 essid WiFiName

You’ll need to get an address now, so run

dhclient

Check if your DNS is working.  If not, as a “hack” manually add it to /etc/resolv.conf and restart the networking service.

sudo echo "nameserver 8.8.8.8" >> /etc/resolv.conf
sudo service networking restart

Your not supposed to manually put the nameservers in resolv.conf.  But it works in a pinch.

Install VMware tools on Ubuntu VM

In Ubuntu the simplest way to install the VMware tools is through apt.

sudo apt-get install open-vmware-tools

Shouldn’t have to do anything else.

You can also install the tools by hitting Install VMware tools from either the web UI, or vShpere.  This will mount a virtual CD on the OS, you can then copy the contents to a local directory in the vm.  You can then proceed to install them by extracting the tar file with

tar -xzf VMware*

cd into the new directory

cd vmware*

and run

sudo ./vmware-install.pl

RAID Volume not accessible in Linux

Typically your RAID volumes will show up as /dev/mdXXX

If it is not, it could be because the device mapper module is not loaded.  Load it by running the following command.

modprobe dm-mod

As a side note you can list the block devices using

dmraid -b

https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=42321

If your still having trouble you can try installing mdadm and dmraid

apt-get install -y dmraid mdadm

 

Delete SNMPv3 User on Linux

Don’t know if this is the recommended way to delete a user, but it seems to work.

sudo service snmpd stop

Open up the snmpd.conf file in /var/lib and find the line with the SNMP user and delete the line

sudo vi /var/lib/snmp/snmpd.conf

Save, exit, and start snmpd

sudo service snmpd start

These steps work for Ubuntu, but should work for any Debain based distro as well as CentOS, Fedora, RedHat etc.

Allow KDE Connect through firewall

Firewalld

sudo firewall-cmd --zone=public --permanent --add-port=1714-1764/tcp
sudo firewall-cmd --zone=public --permanent --add-port=1714-1764/udp
sudo systemctl restart firewalld.service

UFW firewall

sudo ufw allow 1714:1764/udp
sudo ufw allow 1714:1764/tcp
sudo ufw reload

More information https://community.kde.org/KDEConnect