semanage Allow and Delete ports in CentOS

The commands are for CentOS, but should work on Fedora and RedHat.

If semanage is not installed refer to here.

You would typically use this along with the systems firewall to allow a port through.  Guide for firewalld and iptables.  If you change it in the firewall and fail to add/edit it in semanage you can potentially get weird behavior like sshd not wanting to start after changing the port.

Add port

semanage port -a -t ssh_port_t tcp 2222

The above command allows the sshd service to start, using port 2222.

List allowed ports

semanage port -l

You can use grep to filter the results

Example:

[admin@localhost ~]# semanage port -l | grep ssh
ssh_port_t tcp 2222, 22
[admin@localhost ~]#

Delete port

semanage port -d -p tcp 2222

Other examples

Allow SNMP

semanage port -a -t snmp_port_t tcp 2222

 

Parted resizing notes

Launch parted with the following command.  Specify the disk you want to modify.  In this case /dev/sda.

sudo parted /dev/sda

Print partition and available free space.  If you just run print, it will not show you the available free space.

(parted) print free

You can resize, or rather extend a partition using the “resizepart” command inside parted.  Command syntax is as follows

(parted) resizepart PartitionNumber End

Example: Resize partition 1 to 30GB.  Note you’ll need to specify the end part with the GB, otherwise, you’ll be shrinking the partition or making a mess…  You can see what space is available with the “print free” command above

(parted) resizepart 1 30GB

After you have run the resizepart in parted, you’ll need to grow the filesystem, so run one of the following commands from the local shell.

resize2fs /dev/sda1

Or for XFS partitions

xfs_growfs /dev/sda1

You can check the partition size with

df -h

or

sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda

Setup Secure FTP server on CentOS

Setup SFTP Server

When finished you’ll have a SFTP server setup that is configured so the users are in a chroot environment, and can not ssh, or telnet to the server.

Install SSH server if it is not already

yum install openssh-server openssh-client

Create group that is limited to sftp so they can’t ssh, scp etc.

groupadd sftpusers

Add chroot settings to /etc/ssh/sshd_config.  The %u is a variable, which is the users username.

Match Group sftpusers
ChrootDirectory /sftp/%u
ForceCommand internal-sftp

Make ftp directory

mkdir /sftp

Add SFTP user

useradd -g sftpusers -d /sftp -s /sbin/nologin newsftpuser

Create password for new user

passwd newsftpuser

Create directory for user

mkdir /sftp/newsftpuser

Create directory to put ftp files

mkdir /ftp/newsftpuser/files

Change permissions

chown newsftpuser:sftpusers /ftp/newsftpuser/files/

Restart sshd

systemctl restart sshd

Should be good to go.  Test it by logging in with your favorite FTP client.

Recovering LibreNMS from crashed XenServer VM

Had a LibreNMS instance crash, or the VM crashed, not bootable anymore.  Was able to boot it up on a CentOS iso with rescue mode, which gave me access to the files.  So the idea is to manually copy off the LibreNMS files and LibreNMS database and import them to a new LibreNMS instance

Issues

  • Need to access the the system files
  • MySQL doesn’t start in a chroot environment, so no way to do a mysqldump —  (Has to do with systemv or something)

Steps

  1. Create new LibreNMS VM with a new instance of LibreNMS installed
  2. Gain access to the crashed system
  3. Copy over LibreNMS MySQL databases to new LibreNMS instance
  4. Copy over LibreNMS files “/opt/librenms” to new LibreNMS instance
  5. Clean up.  Set users on directories, check SELinux etc.

1. Installing New LibreNMS VM

  • Guide for Ubuntu/Debian distro’s here
  • Guide for for Fedora/CentOS/RedHat here

2. Gaining access to crashed VM

There can be a couple of ways to gain access to a crashed XenServer VM.  One of the easiest ways is to boot up in recovery mode and go through the installers rescue mode.  Guide to boot up XenServer VM in recovery mode here.

The installer rescue mode should detect the OS and mount everything.  If not you should be able to mount the root partition manually.

Once booted up, you’ll need to enable network access if your going to use sftp or scp to copy files.  There are a few different ways to do this

  • Run “dhclient” to pull an address via DHCP
  • Set a static IP address
    • Guide for Ubuntu/Debian distro’s here
    • Guide for fedora/CentOS/RedHat here

3.Copy LibreNMS Mysql Database

Backup the LibreNMS MySQL database directory

tar czvf librenms_mysql.tgz /var/lib/mysql

Use scp or sftp to copy it to the new LibreNMS instance

scp librenms_mysql.tgz user@new_LibreNMS_ip

Now on the new LibreNMS instance we need to run the following few commands

systemctl stop mariadb
rm -rf /var/lib/mysql/*
tar xzvf librenms_mysql.tgz -C /
chown -R mysql:mysql /var/lib/mysql

4. Copy LibreNMS directory

Backup the LibreNMS directory

tar czvf librenms.tgz /opt/librenms

Use scp or sftp to copy it to the new LibreNMS instance

scp librenms.tgz user@new_LibreNMS_ip

Now on the new LibreNMS instance we need to run the following few commands

rm -rf /opt/librenms/*
tar xzvf librenms.tgz -C /
chown -R librenms:librenms /opt/librenms

5. Clean up

Disable SELinux if you have not already.  Guide here

Restart apache, and start mysql.  If your on Ubuntu, the services are named apache2 and mysql

systemctl restart httpd
systemctl restart mariadb

That should get it working, if not try a reboot.

Special notes

The whole MySQL directory needs to be copied, there are innodb files that will keep MySQL from starting if they are not copied.

There is some good info here
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/1795176/how-to-change-mysql-data-directory

How to chroot into a Linux drive

Chrooting can be super useful for changing things like the root password, repairing grub bootloader etc., things that require the system to be mounted.  Typically if your chrooting into an OS drive you can boot up on a Live Linux distro, or use the Rescue feature on some Linux installers.

Mount main drive

Change sdb2 to the root partition of your drive.

mount /dev/sdb2 /mnt

Mount other stuff

mount -t proc none /mnt/proc
mount -o bind /dev /mnt/dev
mount -o bind /sys /mnt/sys

If you want to, you can mount the boot partition.  Change sdb1 if your boot partition is something else.

mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt/boot

Chroot

 chroot /mnt

You should now be inside the chroot environment.  To exit the chroot, hit control+d or type exit.

Change timezone in CentOS, Fedora, RedHat

The file /etc/localtime is a symbolic link to the timezone.  All the timezones are listed in /usr/share/zoneinfo/

Replace America/New_York with the appropriate timezone.

ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York /etc/localtime

You can view the current time zone with the following command

timedatectl

or with date

date +"%Z %z"

Add, List, and Delete iptable rules

Add iptable rule

The following rule rejects access to port 22 on all devices except ones on the 192.168.1.0/24 network.  Note the “!”.  This command can be useful for a WHM/cPanel server to limit ssh access.

iptables -A INPUT ! -s 192.168.1.0/24 -p tcp --dport 22 -j REJECT

List iptable rules with line numbers

iptables -L --line-numbers

Example output

root@localhost [~]# iptables -L --line-numbers
Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT)Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
num target prot opt source destination
1 REJECT tcp -- !192.168.1.11 anywhere tcp dpt:ssh reject-with icmp-port-unreachable

Chain FORWARD (policy ACCEPT)
num target prot opt source destination

Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
num target prot opt source destination
1 ACCEPT tcp -- anywhere anywhere multiport dports smtp,urd,submission owner GID match mailman
2 cpanel-dovecot-solr all -- anywhere anywhere

Chain cpanel-dovecot-solr (1 references)
num target prot opt source destination
1 ACCEPT tcp -- anywhere anywhere multiport sports 8984,7984 owner UID match cpanelsolr

Remove iptable rule

To delete a rule use the -D option with the Chain and the line number.  So to delete the first rule in the example output above, we would specify the INPUT chain and the the line number 1

 iptables -D INPUT 1