Start Minecraft server on RAM disk Linux

Create tmpfs ramdisk.  Note if your Linux user is something other than steve you’ll need to change where appropriate.

mkdir /home/steve/mcdisk

In etc/fstab add the following

tmpfs /home/steve/mcdisk tmpfs defaults,size=4096m 0 0

This creates a 4GB ram disk at /home/steve/mcdisk

To mount it you can either reboot, or run

mount -a

Copy your current Minecraft directory to the ram disk

cp -R /home/steve/Current_MC_Server/ /home/steve/mcdisk

Create a Bash script in “/home/steve” named “ramdisk_save.sh”

Paste the following in.  You may need to install rsync if you do not have it installed

!/bin/bash

RAMDISK="/home/steve/mcram/"
MCDIR="/home/steve/1.13"

rsync -r -t $RAMDISK/ $MCDIR/
rsync -r -t $MCSTORE/ $MCPATH/

Now add the script to crontab

crontab -e

and

 */5 * * * * /home/steve/ramdisk_save.sh

This will now run every 5 minutes and sync any changes on the ram disk to the original directory.

Start the Minecraft server

java -Xmx3072M -Xms3072M -jar server.jar nogui

Windows 10 – Super slow copy speeds

It looks like the Windows Defender Real-time protection can cause issues when trying to copy files on a local drive even if the drive is an SSD.  Typically a copy seems to start out great, but then slows down to a crawl less then 1MB/s copy rate.  Probably has to do with Defender having to scan every file as it is copied.

To fix/increase the copy speeds you can turn off Real-time protection.

To turn off Windows Defender Real-time protection, open up Settings > Update and Security > Windows Security > Virus & threat protection “That should open up the Windows Defender Security Center” > Virus & threat protection settings

Now Turn Real-time protection off.

 

Add a SSL Certificate to Ubiquiti UniFi-Video server using Lets Encrypt

Install certbot

sudo apt-get install python-certbot

Generate certificate.  Change unifi.yourdomain.com to the domain name you have pointing to your UniFi-Video controller.

sudo certbot certonly -d unifi.yourdomain.com

Certbot will create the files in “/etc/letsencrypt/live/unifi.yourdomain.com/”

Now you should stop the unifi service.

systemctl stop unifi

The following two commands create and install the keystore for the UniFi-Video application.  These commands were copied from here.  Thanks scobber!

echo ubiquiti | openssl pkcs12 -export -inkey /etc/letsencrypt/live/unifi.yourdomain.com/privkey.pem -in /etc/letsencrypt/live/unifi.yourdomain.com/cert.pem -name airvision -out /usr/lib/unifi-video/data/keys.p12 -password stdin
echo y | keytool -importkeystore -srckeystore /etc/letsencrypt/live/unifi.yourdomain.com/keys.p12 -srcstoretype pkcs12 -destkeystore /usr/lib/unifi-video/data/keystore -storepass ubiquiti -srcstorepass ubiquiti

Remove or rename the Trusted Store.  If you don’t, the cameras will connect, but will not record.  The controller will rebuild the ufv-truststore when it starts up and the cameras will be able to record.

mv /usr/lib/unifi-video/data/ufv-truststore{,.old}

Start the UniFi-Video service

systemctl start unifi-video

Now you can check it by going to https://unifi.yourdomain.com:8443

Install VMware tools on Ubuntu VM

In Ubuntu the simplest way to install the VMware tools is through apt.

sudo apt-get install open-vmware-tools

Shouldn’t have to do anything else.

You can also install the tools by hitting Install VMware tools from either the web UI, or vShpere.  This will mount a virtual CD on the OS, you can then copy the contents to a local directory in the vm.  You can then proceed to install them by extracting the tar file with

tar -xzf VMware*

cd into the new directory

cd vmware*

and run

sudo ./vmware-install.pl